The Captains Logg

Everyday the Captain and his Crew are writing a few words for those who are at home. Read about it here.

12.10.2015

 With a full day at anchor, while we wait for crew arrivals from Norway, we are taking rare opportunity to wash and paint the ship sides and carry out other maintenance work that cannot be done at sea ahead of our grand arrival at Baltimore in three weeks. The voyage across the Atlantic will start from here this evening and we are looking forward to getting back to the sea routine. With best regards, Captain M. A. Seidl and crew

11.10.2015

We have now anchored off Santa Cruz de Tenerife, where we will remain until tomorrow evening for provisioning and a crew change before continuing westwards. This is as close as we will get to a beach for a while, but bathing from the ship's side and a barbeque on deck are part of the social activities to mark the completion of the first leg of the voyage.
With "warm" regards, Captain M. A. Seidl and cre

10.10.2015

The sailing wind left us yesterday afternoon as expected and during the evening all sails were taken away and furled under a beautiful sunset and the course onwards was set towards Santa Cruz de Tenerife under engine power. As depicted in yesterday's photos, we had a visit by dolphins and some sort of fish that escaped the chief cook's fish hook - this time. Today's activities include emergency drills, study exams and preparations for arrival at the anchorage tomorrow morning.
With best regards, Captain M. A. Seidl and crew


09.10.2015

It's Friday and general cleaning day once again and the ship is bustling with activity above and below decks as painting, varnishing and many other jobs are in progress to keep the ship well maintained. We are presumably enjoying the last of the favorable sailing wind before we have to set our Iron Staysail (main engine) to maintain our schedule for anchoring off Tenerife on Sunday, as we expect light headwinds during the next 24 hours. As illustrated in the snapshot of the day, traffic is once again getting more congested here in the shipping lanes between the Mediterranean and the Canary Islands.

With best regards,
Captain M. A. Seidl and crew


08.10.2015 

Although the days at sea often may seem similar, they are quite different and now that the swells and rolling have abated, this day is quite different from yesterday. We are still enjoying nice weather and comfortable temperatures of 20-23 deg. C. - day and night - and have a nearly ideal course and speed along the coast of Morocco.

With best regards,
Captain M. A. Seidl and crew


07.10.2015

In spite of a period with almost no wind, we have had a day of heavy rolling in swells caused by weather on the other side of the Atlantic, so those who do not have hammocks have lost some sleep during the past night. In today's photo our First Engineer has found a safe place to sit between the workbenches in the engine workshop, while in other areas on the ship, all chores have to be planned in relation to the ship's rolling movements and we all get some extra exercise.

With best regards,
Captain M. A. Seidl and crew

06.07.2015

We were gradually overtaken by the depression from the west and had a period of strong gale force winds and heavy of rain from the southwest during the night and this morning. We now have a light southerly breeze and lighter skies around us and will continue to tack southwards under sail as long as our schedule allows. Yesterday we had yet another passenger - a type of hauk or falcon - that first found shelter from the weather in the chart house and later in one of the engine room air funnels, where the warm air offered comfortable quarters and a piece of meat for breakfast this morning. All is well with both the passenger and the crew.

With best regards,
Captain M. A. Seidl and crew
 


05.10.2015

We were gradually overtaken by the depression from the west and had a period of strong gale force winds and heavy of rain from the southwest during the night and this morning. We now have a light southerly breeze and lighter skies around us and will continue to tack southwards under sail as long as our schedule allows. Yesterday we had yet another passenger - a type of hauk or falcon - that first found shelter from the weather in the chart house and later in one of the engine room air funnels, where the warm air offered comfortable quarters and a piece of meat for breakfast this morning. All is well with both the passenger and the crew.

With best regards,
Captain M. A. Seidl and crew
 


04.10.2015
After a long period with favorable winds, we now have a couple days of headwinds in store, but are still far enough ahead of schedule that we can afford to sail according to the wind and weather until the expected wind change from SW to W takes place. In the meantime the ship's Sunday routines consist of baking in the galley, cleaning the crew accommodations and fishing from the poop deck. The temperatures are stable above 23 deg. C. and the engineers have started the A/C to keep everyone happy.
With best regards,
Captain M. A. Seidl and crew


03.10.2015

We went from sail to engine power late last night in order to get south of a depression which otherwise would give us a period of strong headwinds. We expect to get under sail again on a westerly course once we are at the height og the Strait of Gibraltar sometime tomorrow. In the meantime we have more than enough maintenance work and exercises to keep us busy in the warm temperatures. The saltwater shower is in place on deck and gives the crew an opportunity to cool off in between their efforts.

With best regards,
Captain M. A. Seidl and crew


02.10.2015

We are still sailing southwards in a weak northerly breeze, but are expecting southerly headwinds from tomorrow. Yesterday we had a shark close by and today we have an owl on top of our wind sensor, never a boring moment at sea. The main activity today is a general ship cleaning above and below decks and all is well on board.

With best regards,
Captain M. A. Seidl and crew


01.10.2015

During the past day the wind has become a variable breeze and we are now barely maintaining steerage on a southerly course. The favorable weather conditions will be used to focus on exercises and exterior maintenance before an expected period of headwinds and rain set in during the next few days.
With best regards,
Captain M. A. Seidl and crew .

30.09.2015

Our speed made good the last 24 hours was just under 11 knots, and at midnight we had completed the Biscay crossing. The weather southwards along the Portuguese coast will be much more varied and we expect a prolonged period of headwinds as a low pressure system comes in from the west. As we are well ahead of schedule, we will to continue under sail in spite of the changing conditions as part of the cadet's training. Today's attached photos show the fine-trimmed rigging and the cook's apprentice with his newly adopted and very exhausted friend.

With best regards,
Captain M. A. Seidl and crew


29.09.2015

After a period of variable winds yesterday, we gradually got a fresh northeasterly breeze on the stern quarter and are now making 10-11 knots under a full sail wardrobe. Those who had feared for the Biscay-crossing based on the stories of hard weather voyages from the past, are now enjoying great sailing that many would be envious of. We have also started to see dolphins, whales and have been boarded by a sea bird that has found a passenger seat on the Main yardarm.

With best regards,
Captain M. A. Seidl and crew

28.09.2015

Ever since our departure from Bergen, we had plans to pick up one of the academy midshipmen along the sailing route before crossing the Bay of Biscay and were therefor on a detour in French waters this morning, off the Naval town of Brest, to complete this mission. We are now once again under sail on a southwesterly course and have put 1000 of the 6000 nautical miles to Baltimore behind us. Last night we experienced the total Lunar Eclipse under a starry sky and we hope to find some photos to share. Today's photos show happy crew members on a break and 2 of our new civilian apprentices learning to steer.

With best regards,
Captain M. A. Seidl and crew

27.09.2015
We are enjoying a nice sailing wind on our way out of the English Channel and expect to be out in the Atlantic Ocean on a course southwards later today. The high pressure weather is expected to continue for a couple days yet and we hope to have a favorable sailing wind across the Bay of Biscay in the days ahead. In the meantime we have good conditions for the big, weekly cleaning of the ship as well as the various exercises and competitions that the cadets have planned I order to meet their development goals. The cooks are keeping us well fed and the engineers are ready start the air conditioning if it should get too warm in the weeks ahead. All is well on board.

With best regards,
Captain M. A. Seidl and crew

26.09.2015

We lost the wind late last night as the high pressure center passed through and had to continue under engine power to get through the heavily trafficked Channel currents. We passed the characteristic white cliffs of Dover at breakfast time this morning and hope to be under sail on a freshening northerly wind later today. The sun is shining from a clear sky and the conditions are optimal for maintenance, training and studies.

With best regards,
Captain M. A. Seidl and crew


25.09.2015

The winds stayed fresh from the west through the night and we have put well over 200 nm behind us under sail the 24 hrs. and are now approaching the entrance to the English Channel, where we expect to sail through during the weekend. The high pressure weather is now giving us weaker winds, calmer seas and warmer temperatures and the ship's routines and Naval classes are well established.

With best regards,

Captain M. A. Seidl and crew

24.09.2015

Our strategy to get across the North Sea to find sailing wind has paid off and early this morning we started setting sail and are now sailing under Topgallants in a fine Southwesterly wind. We still hope to make it southwards and through the Channel under sail before the wind disappears in an approaching high pressure center. The progression of our cadets is good and they are now involved in all aspects of watch and operation duties and all is well on board.

With best regards,

Captain M. A. Seidl and crew

 

23.09.2015

Yesterday afternoon a few tons of provisions and equipment were loaded and the cadets checked out in familiarization of basic watch and safety routines. After a short farewell with family and friends and a final mustering on dry land, the cadets went on board cast and off from the Royal Norwegian Naval Academy at 1800 hours as planned. We are now on our way across the North Sea in order to position ourselves for an expected sailing winds further to the west, which we hope will bring us through the English Channel. The learning process for the cadets is as challenging as always, while the fine weather is an unexpected bonus and moral is high.


With best regards,

Captain M. A. Seidl and crew











LEHMKUHL Aug . 2009 028

Life on board

LEHMKUHL Aug . 2009 028

History in brief

Statsraad Lehmkuhl (copyright Wenche C. Olsen)

Crew

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The Captains Logg